The Grand Magazine Edition (The Isle of Pines: Texts) (Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence) By Utopian Studies

The Grand Magazine Edition (The Isle of Pines: Texts) (Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence)

By Utopian Studies

  • Release Date: 2006-01-01
  • Genre: Religion & Spirituality

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Description

The Grand Magazine of Universal Intelligence, and Monthly Chronicle of Our Own Times announced in its title what it aspired to be, a kind of periodical encyclopedia that recounted all that was worth knowing in the many, burgeoning fields of human intelligence and exploration, whether of plant physiology or distant travels. One instance of exploration that the journal printed, in its August 1758 issue, was the story of George Pines' voyage to the isle of Pines. Like the Cramoisy edition, The Grand Magazines version was presented as a report, written in the third, not the first, person. Unlike the Cramoisy edition, The Grand Magazine version retains much of George Pines' original letter and quotes it extensively (translating it into the third person and into modernized spelling and punctuation); and The Grand Magazine, like Pines' letter, does not give the location of the isle. But most of the sex has been removed, and with it much of the intrigue and power. Agency, motivation, and activities are shifted: rather than "Idleness and Fulness of every thing" begetting in George "a desire of enjoying the women" and rather than their "Lusts" giving them "liberty" to engage in sexual intercourse openly (12), in The Grand Magazine "nature put them in mind of the great command of the Almighty to our first parents, as if they had been conducted thither by the hand of Providence, to people a new world." God's commands and colonial plantation replace dalliance and lust. Nor are the subsequent sexual politics reported, except for two hints: that George has "two favourite wives" and that his master's daughter "seemed to be his greatest favourite"; but what that favoritism means is not suggested. So George's racial prejudices, for instance, are blanked out, and with the omission of sexual behavior the imbalance of George's attention between sexual behavior and community politics is occluded. Although many specific instances of Pines' lack of application to governing and cultivating the island are omitted, that important theme does, however, remain clearly stated: The Grand Magazine's version reproduces literally George Pines' words that "this place (had it the culture, that skilful people might bestow on it) would prove a Paradise" (11).